Ashley Miah: Crafting Purposeful Pop Art and Empowering Artists

Rob Lee:
Welcome to the truth in this art. I am your host, Rob Lee. Thanks for listening and being a part of this continuing conversation on arts and culture. Today, I have the privilege of being in conversation with the Afro-Latina artist from New York City who focuses on acrylic painting. This artist creates large works of contemporary pop art paintings that play on nineties pop culture and urban NYC culture.

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Rob Lee:
New York City. For those who are adept along with paintings and mixed media, combining pop culture references and spirituality. Please welcome Ashley Miah. Welcome to the podcast.

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Ashley Miah:
Hi. Thank you for having me.

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Rob Lee:
I almost had the you welcome and all always had to give you your your actual real title. Leelee La Cubana. So with that, I want to start off with a few a few quick things just to kind of lay, you know, you want to start the conversation, I want to go off then these really hard questions and the deep thinking questions.

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Rob Lee:
I'd like to go with the general sort of before we get too deep. Can you share the the Ashley Miah story? What is the story? How did you get started? What was your first experience in art and things of that nature? So if you will.

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Ashley Miah:
Yeah, sure. So I am from the Lower East Side in New York, which is a now very gentrified area in Lower Manhattan. But it was very urban community before that. And growing up, I was just into art. And I ended up I was I attended zone schools growing up. So anyone from an urban background knows what that means.

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Rob Lee:
Yes, we do.

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Ashley Miah:
Yes, we do. But New York offers and most major cities have like specialized high schools. So I don't know if you know of like the famed school LaGuardia Arts. I actually expressed interest to like my art teacher. We I was lucky enough to have an art program in junior high school, which is unfortunate to say. I was lucky enough, but I.

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Ashley Miah:
I expressed interests about art and she actually encouraging us to take the specialized high school exam and audition to get in and LaGuardia actually really shaped my interest in art and developed my interest in art and my skill. And from there, like after high school for college, initially I enrolled in environmental engineering at Philadelphia University. I Science wasn't my passion.

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Ashley Miah:
Science wasn't my passion. So I went back into studying art. And here I just been pursuing it ever since. So here I am.

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Rob Lee:
Thank you. So I like when people talk about creativity and imagination. What sorts of things help fuel your imagination.

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Ashley Miah:
So for me, a lot of my imagination comes from experience. I'm very nostalgic, especially creatives. I feel like from places that are now gentrified and nostalgia is is really something special to our urban communities because we are seeking of familiarity. Sometimes things feel so far away to the life that I currently have built for myself compared to my upbringing and my surroundings and my culture.

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Ashley Miah:
And so you see things that disappear and change over time, and so you hold on to certain memories. So a lot of my imagination is based on experience and culture.

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Rob Lee:
100%. I totally agree with that. And I think in doing things like this, where we kind of control what's of interest, right where I'm going to do this podcast, I'm going to talk to people that I find interesting. It's a moment in time and it's you know, I could talk to you six months from now, and it can be a very completely different conversation.

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Rob Lee:
There are certain things that are baked in that are from the lived experience. You are who you are. But, you know, it's like, remember when we talked about this and we talked about this nineties card who talked about rocko's modern life for like 20 minutes? You know, it's one of those things, but I think it's important to be able to capture that.

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Rob Lee:
And this is the medium in which I choose to capture it because those stories can disappear. And then you're like, Remember that thing? And I don't remember it because there's no documentation of it. There is no archive of it, if you will.

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Ashley Miah:
Yeah, I totally agree. And I love podcasts for that reason too. Like it's it's a great way to just, like, relive a moment in a sense, or just like listen and or be a part of a conversation, even like it's a really cool thing.

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Rob Lee:
Yeah, I get to geek out on occasion. I recorded one last night. I do a movie review podcast outside of this, and I have a buddy who's a huge Fifth Element fan and we were from the nineties and he and I talked about an hour about we, we reviewed it, we sat there for an hour at the radio station though, at the college radio station here.

00;05;13;03 - 00;05;32;03
Rob Lee:
And I was like, This is where I'm at now. I'm able to do this in radio stations. And this was as goofy idea. And I'm talking about a 25 year old movie that I saw when I was like 12. I was like, This is what I'm able to do. But being able to really get dipped into that conversation and I don't know who's talking about this at that level, who's having that kind of conversation now.

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Rob Lee:
So it was really cool to do that.

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Ashley Miah:
Yeah, for sure.

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Rob Lee:
So let's, let's talk about culture candy. Let's talk about heart. Conn Yeah.

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Ashley Miah:
First.

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Rob Lee:
Let's, let's talk about a few, few of these things. What was the thinking that led to their creation and ultimately as a creator and as a person in this sort of role, taking on like these these these interest, what do you want to offer the community?

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Ashley Miah:
So I'll start with the development and the ideas. So I want to say in 2019, I was working at the Brooklyn DA's office with a friend, DeLuca, and I was in my thesis finishing my BFA. And because I was one of those people that like worked and then went to school part time. So I just took my time with my degree, especially because it's an art and it's something I already practice.

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Ashley Miah:
So I didn't feel urgency in that at the time. But I was talking to my friends at work and Zeke is also an artist and neither of us felt fulfilled in the legal field, especially working for the prosecution side of the justice system with everything that was going on at the time, and that still currently goes on. So we both felt that we needed to leave and at the same time, the professor I had for my thesis year was very into data as and was really encouraging artists to in his class to make project based on his interest instead of exploring their individual niches as their theses.

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Ashley Miah:
Yeah. So what I wanted to do, I wanted to do something that was an ode to my culture and to kind of connect with people who are from minority cultures. And I was talking to my friends about it and I was like, I really want to do something that has like a slogan attached to it that's like for the culture and then like can be translated like for Spanish, Latin communities through like with Dora and kind of thing.

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Ashley Miah:
It kind of blends my cultures and it blends and I think it speaks a lot to representation and things like that. And we were, we were like, you know what? Why not try to figure out how to create something based on this idea I had and we went through a bunch of names. We had like a name generator, like, you know, those things online.

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Ashley Miah:
And I'm like, I like entering culture into all of them to see what comes up and the culture can be like. As soon as we saw it, we were like, trademark it, an LLC. Like Let's figure out how to make this thing. And so the culture, Candy, initially it was for pop up, so it was kind of create this collective of underrepresented artists and have pop ups that give them a space to showcase their work and have a voice and presence in the field.

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Ashley Miah:
And things have just gotten bigger and bigger. And now we're doing bigger curation. We curate for restaurants and facilities throughout the city and in different areas, and we're actually doing a show for Art Basel Week. Yeah, things are just getting bigger and bigger and part fun is a branch of culture candy and it's actually the idea is to eventually have this biennial convention, a big art convention in New York City, and to have New York City Art Week.

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Ashley Miah:
And that's something that we don't have. So we actually started that this year. And yeah, it's just it's been a it's been a ride and it's going to continue to be a journey.

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Rob Lee:
I love this. I love hearing this. And yeah, you mentioned something is is is early on is typing it into the name generator. That is literally how childish Gambino got named Childish Gambino. This is like the Wu-Tang name generator. Mom's wasn't good. It was. It was something like Painful Abit. And I was like, I don't know if I want that.

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Rob Lee:
I don't think I want to use that for a podcast or an alias. I can't that doesn't fit on a jersey. That doesn't work.

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Ashley Miah:
It doesn't fit on a jersey. Speaking of Childish Gambino, we actually saw him at our we did a market takeover for Chelsea Market and we actually saw him walk through our exhibit. We didn't want to bother him. So. But yeah. Just because you brought it up, I just thought of that.

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Rob Lee:
That's that's one that's one of my guys like I was thinking the other day of, you know, pie in the sky. And there are a few instances and this may be one where this interview with you may be one where sometimes you shoot your shot and you get somebody that you hired. How the hell did that happen? And you want to be authentic and you want to be able to have that sort of conversation and connect, but you don't want to be overbearing.

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Rob Lee:
So definitely, yeah, I'm just really starting to think in those terms because you never know who is to say ultimately, oh hell yeah, but oh yeah, let's do that. Let's, let's go on a call. Let's talk, let's talk. And, and I like and I think that's really important. I think people are really busy, but I think when that opportunity presents itself, just to be able to talk with other creatives, that's that's important.

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Rob Lee:
So which brings me to this question I've been asking people and before we even, like dove further in it, you don't have this question, but at least want to ask you this in your experience in going to art school and being around artists and being around creatives who well, who are the best conversationalists among the different disciplines, like photographers, really good or painters kind of like because I got a buddy who's a painter and he's like, Yeah, we might be dicks.

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Rob Lee:
He's like, I'm saying that as a painter. So who are the people you've talked to who are artists and kind of like who has like the best conversation or what kind of conversations do you like with the artists that you're around?

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Ashley Miah:
Oh, there's different levels of this question a little bit because the first art school I went to was actually multidisciplinary in the sense that it was open to, you know, music and performing arts, kind of tech design, all kinds of things. And I want to say in that sense, the best conversationalists were I want to say the vocal majors, they were they were expressive enough where it's just like the drama majors were overwhelmed.

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Rob Lee:
It's really funny.

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Ashley Miah:
Interviews. But in terms of a of a like today's sense where I'm dealing with people in the visual art world, it's a little hard to say because a lot of the events that we do, we have big opening nights and we do like these huge pop up events like we did one called the bodega and three 300 and something people came through this, but everyone is pretty social.

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Ashley Miah:
It is the art scene. So, you know, there are some characters we'll say.

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Rob Lee:
Oh.

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Ashley Miah:
But yeah, in terms of conversation, I mean, everyone seems to have their own story. And that's the thing too. I'm dealing with people on a networking sense. Yeah. So it's like people are really being authentic and sharing their story and things like that. So it's hard to say like what discipline has, has the better conversation.

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Rob Lee:
Now I do it, I dig it. And that's as a very it's a very enriched answer because it's like, oh, well, what about these? But you thought it was a shout out to you on that. And in terms of going to some of these like sort of art oriented networking sort of things, I can't wait till I'm able to kind of put together my artist's esthetic, like being in that scene.

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Rob Lee:
I want to go for Walter Mercado and just like, have a cape on. It's like, why? Why are you dressed like that, bro? Because it's just you see us here. I'm not a brimmed hat guy. I'm more of a cape guy.

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Ashley Miah:
I seen a couple of capes so you can make it happen.

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Rob Lee:
Oh, just look. Look, I'm a big dude. I'm going to go for Andre. Leo, just like, look, where is my caftan? I need my caftan. I need it starched. Are you more interested? I think I know the answer based on the conversation thus far, but I'm looking for the why here I guess. Are you more interested in the art or the artist and why?

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Ashley Miah:
So for me, my perspective is, you know, the artists create art, but you know, art as an umbrella in general, I think because it's an extension of each artist. So it's, it's it shows their experience, their story, you know, their emotion. It really depends on the art form and what's being translated. But it's kind of a difficult question because I'm more so interested in the art.

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Ashley Miah:
My, my, I like producing art. Sometimes having a curation company kind of takes away from my, my time in terms of being able to create. And I have a very booked schedule as an, as an individual artist. So it kind of puts me on a strict timeline, but I really am into the creation process and the curation as well, dealing with artists in a business sense is difficult sometimes because you have a lot of different personalities and different levels of understanding of the politics in the art game.

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Rob Lee:
Sure.

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Ashley Miah:
And being a company that is artist run and therefore are my priority and my team's priority is always going to be representing the artists as best as we can with the resources we have, because it's personal to us, because we're in their shoes as well or we're in their shoes. So. So yeah, it's hard to say. I don't know which one I care about more, but I really have like a passion and love for the whole, the whole umbrella of it.

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Rob Lee:
And I appreciate that. Again, you know, I think it's I'm one of these people that looks at the broadness like, you know, I think being able to explain and have like this is my take and answers are never easy, you know what I mean? Like, oh, so what is this? There's no set of answers more than one way to get to it.

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Rob Lee:
And that's just that artistic brain work. And I think a lot of times people are creative problem solvers and it's like, you know, and that's why I say I want to focus on why. So tell me about a time to sound so like an interview interview, but tell me about a time where, like, someone gave you a shot that's been very influential for you in in what you do today.

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Ashley Miah:
So I want to say the most recent event that really gave me a shot and helped position me so me, I'm a planner, so I plan my art career. For the past three years, I've been planning my art career like two years ahead of like each step I want to take and how I want to produce things. And so earlier this year, I took six months off of showing any work, even on social media, to produce a solo show that was going to be like all revealed on the same day.

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Ashley Miah:
Like, I had like this huge plan for it. So the last show that I did before that I really strategized on, there's this artist I was following. His name is Francisco Tierra, and he has a big following in the hip hop game. And like, there's people that are in the NBA or, you know, rappers and things like that that go to his opening night.

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Ashley Miah:
And he was having a show in Brooklyn. And I shot my shot. I didn't know. And I was just like, this is what my art looks like. This is my mission. And I want to know if you have room to show like this, even if it's just one piece. Can I have a piece in your upcoming show? And it was just a solo show, so I was being bold as it is, and he was just like, You know what?

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Ashley Miah:
I love your energy. I love everything that you're that you're doing. And I want you to bring, like, six pieces. Like, I went through your page. I want you to bring, like, six pieces of his whole wall, and we'll do, like, a combination show. And I was like and like, no commission, nothing up front, anything like that. And there was there was people in the industry there and things like that.

00;18;21;25 - 00;18;30;14
Ashley Miah:
And it did get me a lot of exposure. I gained like I want to say the week of the show, I gained like 500 followers just from showing with him.

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Rob Lee:
Wow.

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Ashley Miah:
Yeah. So that was a huge shot for me. And that helped. Like, you know, he helped cross-promote my my solo show. That was six months after that. And ever since then, like, the ball's been roll. I've been like booked on like big consignments and things like that. So that for me was a huge, a huge help.

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Rob Lee:
That's, that's great. I love here and stuff like that. Like, you know, again, the theme Shooting Your Shot, Junior shot. So let's talk about Lee. I think there are some obvious ones. Let's talk about some of the benefits of an arts education and kind of maybe some of those lessons that you learned that when you're in the lab now, they're like real life anyway.

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Rob Lee:
I don't know if that's how that works.

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Ashley Miah:
So the benefits of an arts education is definitely I say this to artists. I know a lot of artists that went to art school and a lot of artists that did not go to art school. And they all have a lot of, you know, the start of your career is it comes from your inner confidence and now a lot of artists ask me a lot of questions, I'll just say so.

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Ashley Miah:
You know, I often find myself telling artists that are insecure or don't know if it was worth it going to art school or Oh, I should have went to art school. And it's just like, you know, honestly, art school is a lot of studying what master artists did to be successful without giving an understanding of how to become a successful artist yourself.

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Ashley Miah:
And in that sense, you really don't need to go to art school. You there's so many resources nowadays that you can kind of kind of perfect your craft and learn on your own. There's master class. There's like all these online resources that Lynda whatever people use for whatever craft, YouTube for free. And a lot of it is just practice.

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Ashley Miah:
Like your skill will develop in the area of interest that you that you're pursuing the more you practice. And art school is interesting because you know, the first few years you're practicing in a bunch of different areas, not one specific skill is developing except for maybe drawing and piano precision because it's I mean, it's a lot of different areas.

00;21;08;20 - 00;21;43;13
Ashley Miah:
You're doing color theory, you're doing, you know, until like maybe your last year, year and a half, you're in one area. For me, I went through the same process of literally classes in art school. LaGuardia's honestly, their art education was a one for the better language, but their art through college, like, I just felt like I was repeating the same lessons and I only pursued my my degree to be the first college graduate in my immediate family.

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Ashley Miah:
So I but I honestly don't think you need to pursue an arts education to be an artist, a successful artist.

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Rob Lee:
Thank you. That's that's what I've been hearing. So you're worried as we touched on earlier, you know, nineties, pop culture references, NYC, all of that good stuff in there and like I dig it, I went through a few different things. I was like, All right, this is the space we have. I like this. Oh, you're welcome in. And I think a lot of times what we kind of put in our work, those references, they kind of reveal who we are, give the viewer maybe a peek into who we are and what we're about, or in my case, the listeners or what have you.

00;22;26;28 - 00;22;49;07
Rob Lee:
You know, I'll make references to some of the goofier stuff and it's like, Yeah, I did that for that 2% of people that's going to get it. So how do you embrace those qualities? Like has it always been that way or is it something that you kind of grew into? But those qualities that make you like unique, that make you uniquely you really that kind of go into your work.

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Rob Lee:
So tell me about that.

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Ashley Miah:
In a world of what's trending, right, it's really hard to be someone who's gender genuinely interested in being a pop artist and honing in on that niche when there's a lot of product pop, pop art. And when I say that, I mean like people are making or trying to step into the lane of pop art in order to be trendy because it's such easily referenced work where you can easily gain a connected audience.

00;23;20;22 - 00;23;49;17
Ashley Miah:
For me, I like to phrase it as I create purposeful pop art. And so what I mean by that is I have like a message or I have an experience or a story that I'm telling, like all the work I created for retrospect where things like, for example, I had a photo of Avenue D, you know, Smith housing the chicken spot on the corner and there was a cop there and I did the Warner Brothers kind of intro circle.

00;23;49;17 - 00;24;22;10
Ashley Miah:
And if you see a couple Warner Brothers you had a like there's reference, there's culture, there's substance. So having substance in my pop art is important to me. Like right now I'm s I this year I released I have a new signature. It's a diamond. Yeah. And so that diamond is reflective of, like, internal richness and what, you know, you grow up not having much and you grow up seeing the loved ones around you and the people around you in your neighborhood kind of, you know, years.

00;24;22;13 - 00;25;11;04
Ashley Miah:
We're still rich in something, you know, we may not have the socioeconomic riches that are we're we're taught to chase, but we have internal values and we're rich in culture. And that's something that I really like try to push through my pop art. So when I use like those kind of references and stuff, it's either referencing like a memory or an experience in which like all those different elements were like came together to create that kind of nostalgic feeling or representative of like the culture or like, for example, I just met made a piece like Rich in Vibes and it's like the Pink Panther martini glass, like a wave, like all of these different elements,

00;25;11;04 - 00;25;33;04
Ashley Miah:
money. But it's like, you know, it's like that feeling where it's just like maybe back in the day I saved up, I got a dress, and me and my girl saved up, and we went out for, like, brunch or dinner, and we just had rich bitch energy for the night because we had the vibes that day. Like, it's those kind of memories that I want to translate through the art.

00;25;33;12 - 00;26;00;22
Rob Lee:
I love that. Thank you. So here's the last real question I got for you. Kind of a two parter. Tell me why. Actually, it's just one part. So tell me, who are those who or what of those sort of anti influences, those creative energy dreamers? Every now and again I see it and I'm like, I need to leave the environment I'm in to maybe be enriched to to fill that cup, to do something that is creatively regenerative.

00;26;01;04 - 00;26;08;07
Rob Lee:
Because I realized I'm around those sort of like creative energy trainers or anti influences. What did those look like for you?

00;26;08;27 - 00;26;38;27
Ashley Miah:
So I want to say those anti influences are definitely I don't know how else to phrase phrase this, but like fear projectors and want to say that, you know, we're not taught to think too big, especially when you're from specific types of backgrounds, socio economically that. But that's just my truth. And you know, it's like this term of starving artist is is very popular.

00;26;38;27 - 00;27;31;16
Ashley Miah:
We don't have art funding in schools. It's not it's not advertised as a part of the education system for us. So it's just like you want to be an artist like, you know, so projection and learning how to not accept that is, is, was definitely an anti influence for me, hence the environmental engineering and real lit. But you know, you get past that and you get through that and then as you get successful, it becomes people who are not forwardly supportive or able to keep up with, you know, the pace that you're going at and, you know, people people always meet you at your destination.

00;27;31;17 - 00;27;58;20
Ashley Miah:
You know, everyone has different timing. So I tell artists all the time, like, you really need to focus on what's driving you and your path, even if it means temp temporarily leaving people where they are because we all I mean, you know, we all have different paths, but we're all going to a destination. We're all, you know, in the same society where it's like, well, we all want the bag, let's call it that.

00;27;58;25 - 00;28;05;00
Ashley Miah:
The people will get there. Their mindset just needs to catch up and you just can't take things personal.

00;28;05;15 - 00;28;29;21
Rob Lee:
Yeah, I find myself in that spot and you know, having shifts and you have friends or people that are around that that just aren't in it. It's almost like it's baked in at times, this sort of like lonely thing because you're like, Oh, I'm getting friends and so on. And things just feel kind of surface level. It's like, Oh, I'm doing a show, I'm doing this event or substance event, and people don't, they'll show up or what have you.

00;28;29;21 - 00;28;49;16
Rob Lee:
And that's it's odd. It's an odd thing. And I find that ultimately what I'm doing or whatever I'm attempting to do, there's so many other things that I have in my mind was almost like, Hey, write me a pitch as to what you're going to do for this grant or this and say, Cool, before I even get started.

00;28;49;16 - 00;29;07;17
Rob Lee:
That's where I'm at now. So it's like I have these ideas and they're better than what you're going to throw out. So because I have a sense of where I'm going, I'm going what feels interesting then trying even been doing an interview, some people will say, Hey, just ask, you know, this person is this type of artist, this have these types of these questions.

00;29;07;28 - 00;29;31;16
Rob Lee:
I rather have unique questions each time. I rather do something that feels like, is this interesting to me? This driving for me? And if it's not, then it's like, why am I doing it? You know what I mean? And I think that that's an important distinction to make as to why you're doing it and where you're going. And to your point, not everybody who wants to be in that same, you know, I mean, not everyone wants to take the train there.

00;29;31;16 - 00;29;34;14
Rob Lee:
Some people want to fly there. Some people don't even want to leave.

00;29;34;14 - 00;29;34;29
Ashley Miah:
Right.

00;29;36;04 - 00;30;01;28
Rob Lee:
So with that, I want to go into these rapid fire questions. Please indulge me. These are ridiculous questions. But they're fun. They're fun questions. So and brevity is key here. Don't overthink them. Don't overthink them. Don't think, though. So here's the first one. Describe your style however you want to frame it in one word artsy. Okay.

00;30;02;23 - 00;30;04;02
Ashley Miah:
Like my physical style.

00;30;05;02 - 00;30;13;09
Rob Lee:
You do however you want to see on a Friday night you are.

00;30;14;00 - 00;30;17;02
Ashley Miah:
Eating and drinking. I mean, I go to restaurants a lot.

00;30;17;28 - 00;30;19;17
Rob Lee:
Okay, you're doing very well so far.

00;30;19;29 - 00;30;20;14
Ashley Miah:
Okay.

00;30;20;21 - 00;30;28;07
Rob Lee:
Uh, now they're. But they just get really weird now. Actually, this one's not really weird. What do you think about most in the shower?

00;30;28;07 - 00;30;36;17
Ashley Miah:
Um, to be honest with you, I listen to music at the shower. That's like the time for me to clear my my head.

00;30;36;25 - 00;30;41;27
Rob Lee:
So, so. And I'm thinking, actually, I'm getting things out right.

00;30;41;27 - 00;30;44;20
Ashley Miah:
I'm thinking.

00;30;44;20 - 00;30;51;01
Rob Lee:
Okay, now this is these these last two are ridiculous. Tell me a song that is on your Ratchet or Toxic playlist.

00;30;51;22 - 00;30;54;01
Ashley Miah:
My Ratchet playlist.

00;30;54;01 - 00;30;54;25
Rob Lee:
Everyone has one.

00;30;55;16 - 00;31;11;11
Ashley Miah:
I mean, I think a lot of my library may be considered ratchet, to be honest, I'm a hip hop head, so it's really hard to say. But I'm very I'm known for being able to go the whole length of dreams and nightmares.

00;31;11;14 - 00;31;12;16
Rob Lee:
So that's a good one.

00;31;13;03 - 00;31;14;11
Ashley Miah:
I'll, I'll go with that.

00;31;14;14 - 00;31;19;18
Rob Lee:
That's a good one. That's a good way. That's that's I'm like my gym playlist is like almost a lift really heavy. Now.

00;31;19;29 - 00;31;21;16
Ashley Miah:
Right now I got to go hard.

00;31;22;07 - 00;31;28;07
Rob Lee:
Here's the last one. You know, Candy Bodegas, top three, bodega candies.

00;31;28;26 - 00;31;36;09
Ashley Miah:
Oh, top three bodega candies, sour power straws.

00;31;36;09 - 00;31;36;28
Rob Lee:
That's like.

00;31;37;00 - 00;31;37;05
Ashley Miah:
The.

00;31;38;20 - 00;31;39;17
Rob Lee:
Number one seed right there.

00;31;40;05 - 00;31;50;25
Ashley Miah:
Right? Sure. I want to say, is it really be? The flower power show is like in all three flavors overall.

00;31;50;27 - 00;31;51;11
Rob Lee:
Is it?

00;31;51;22 - 00;31;53;03
Ashley Miah:
That's my legit answer.

00;31;53;20 - 00;31;57;26
Rob Lee:
I'm here for it. I'm here for it. I mean, they're fire. They're they're fired. I never they never miss.

00;31;58;08 - 00;31;59;25
Ashley Miah:
They never miss all hits.

00;32;00;13 - 00;32;13;18
Rob Lee:
So with that, I want to thank you for coming on to this podcast, and I want to invite and encourage you to tell the fine folks where to check your workout. Social media website and all that good stuff. And again, thank you for being on this podcast. The floor is yours.

00;32;14;12 - 00;32;30;10
Ashley Miah:
Awesome. Thank you so much for having me. I actually had a really good time with our conversation. You can actually find me on Instagram under LeeLee La Cubana, LeeLee La Cubana, I don't want to spell that word or LeeLee La Cuban.com

00;32;30;21 - 00;32;50;15
Rob Lee:
Well, there you have it, folks. I want to again thank LeeLee La Cubana, Ashley Miah for coming on to the podcast. And I'm Rob Lee saying that there is culture in art in and around your neck of the woods. You just got to look for it.

Creators and Guests

Rob Lee
Host
Rob Lee
The Truth In This Art is an interview series featuring artists, entrepreneurs and tastemakers in & around Baltimore.
Ashley Miah
Guest
Ashley Miah
an Afro-Latina artist from New York City who focuses on acrylic painting
Ashley Miah: Crafting Purposeful Pop Art and Empowering Artists
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